Insight_4th Edition

INSIGHT MARQUIS WHO?S WHO THIRD EDITION INSIDE: Q&As with Todayís Leading Marquis Luminaries and Influencers FOURTH ď The whole industry is exciting to me at this point. As a whole, itís exciting to see how people who do what I do, which is alter the perception of sound.Ē Ė Brandon L. Swain Chief Operating Officer Swaintech Entertainment Group LLC Keith D. Amparado Communications Company Executive Herbert Barry III, PhD Psychologist The Hon. Samuel L. Bufford Philosophy and Law Professor, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge, Lawyer Dr. Delores Phife Buford Education Educator, Researcher Michael A. Cervantes Elementary School Educator (Retired) Robert B. Comizzoli, PhD Scientist (Retired) Abigail Nowlin Crawford Author, Consultant John W. Fisher, PhD, PE, NAE Civil Engineering Educator, Professor Emeritus Timothy D. Francis, DC Chiropractor Dr. Harold W. Furchtgott-Roth Senior Fellow Gail L. Hayden Director Phyllis J. Heffner, MD Child Psychiatrist Bruce Jerry Kelman, PhD, DABT, ATS, ERT Toxicologist, Consultant J. Antonio Lopez, MD Medical Doctor, Owner Parker A. Lynch Chief Executive Officer Dr. Anthony Wayne Middleton Jr. Urologist, Educator Hugh Patrick, PhD Economist, Educator (Retired) Dr. S. Kay Rockwell Educator Shara Sand, PsyD Psychologist Mike Syropoulos, EdD School Systems Supervisor (Retired) Prof. Xingwu Wang, PhD Professor of Electrical Engineering Wendy L. Ward, PhD, ABPP, FAPA Director of Interprofessional Faculty Development

Letter from the Editor Marquis Who's Who Insight is published by Marquis Whoís Who Ventures LLC 350 RXR Plaza, Uniondale, NY 11556 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means Ė including, but not limited to, electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise Ė or used for any commercial purpose whatsoever without the prior written permission of the publisher and, if the publisher deems necessary, execution of a formal license agreement with the publisher. Manufactured in the United States of America. Chief Executive Officer Erica Lee Executive Vice President, HR and Organizational Development Deborah A. Morrissey Director, Editorial Services Renée Dutcher-Pryer Director, Print Production John Sartoris Senior Graphic Designer Carlton Ramsey Assistant, Editorial Jaclynkelli Kronemberg Technical Administrator, Editorial Charles Varriale Manager, Transcription Jamie Daniels Director, Compliance and Quality Assurance Iris Cannetti Director, Branding Services Nikki Masih Director, New Memberships Michael Swinarski The Marquis Whoís Who roster is comprised of the most diverse professionals worldwide. Our biographees represent a healthy assortment of industries, including education, law, health care, science and technology, social services, arts and entertainment, finance and philanthropy. Insight is a unique publication through which professionals Ė regardless of expertise Ė are a provided a platform to share their backgrounds, experience, trials and successes in their own words. Each time we go into publication on an issue of Insight, a theme becomes apparent as a result of the human experience in todayís world. Interestingly, the feedback that we receive from doctors is oftentimes similar to that which we receive from lawyers, educators, civil servants, etc. It is clear that certain trends and world events impact all professions, and these threads weave themselves within the pages of this publication to highlight a common ground. One of the themes that remains ever-present in Insight is technology and the benefits and challenges that it has introduced into business and life at large. Many of the listees featured within this edition of Insight have offered perceptive commentary regarding the benefits and obstacles of a world that continues to evolve technologically, andwhat these changes and developments may mean for the professional sphere for years to come. At Marquis Whoís Who, we share the sentiments made by our listees and embrace the opportunities that technology provides to enhance the shared experience with our brand. It is our privilege to continue to explore new paths and harness the power of technology to share our listeesí stories, commemorate their legacies, and offer opportunities for continued growth and development. We hope you enjoy perusing the latest edition of Insight to meet the listees profiled within. As you read this exclusive content, we welcome you to reflect on your own progression and consider the power of your own voice. Most sincere regards, Renée Dutcher-Pryer Editorial Director Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 3

Keith D. Amparado Communications Company Executive New York, NY https://youtu.be/DUdtZkxl3Lk What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? I never expect to know everything, so I try to assemble groups of people who have knowledge in various areas so that whatever we produce has the benefits of combined knowledge. I always make sure to consult with others. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? Education and the way in which we deliver it has changed drastically over the years. Itís harder for students especially when they reach high school and they start thinking about what they would like to do because generally speaking, we donít provide counseling that helps them to make those kinds of important decisions. So, they enter college and pick a major because itís something they like or is something theyíre good at, but they havenít really had an opportunity to discuss the field with someone knowledgeable. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? The important thing for me is getting people educated to the point where they have a bachelorís degree because if they donít, they will never really be competitive in todayís world. Itís a societal problem. When I got out of high school if you didnít have money, you went to a city college because the tuition was quite reasonable and you could take a loan. Now, that is still possible, but itís not nearly as easy as it once was. We do have a lot of special programs, but that information is not always available or made public, so a lot of students lose out. Herbert Barry III, PhD Psychologist Pittsburgh, PA www.marquismillennium.com/barry What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? In my early childhood, I did a lot of reading and I collected political cartoons from 1939 to 1945. So, I was very interested in politics and world affairs. Some of my articles are about past presidents of the United States. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? The most difficult challenge in the last five or 10 years has been publishing articles. Instead of submitting a manuscript and a letter to the editor-and-chief, Iíve been confronted with ornamented requirements, and doing it on the internet has been very difficult. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Financing articles in scientific journals has been a change. There is an effort to charge an office a specific fee, for example, $1,000 to make a published article open access. People can then reproduce the article using email or the internet without any cost; however, there seems to be a fairly heavy cost to the office if it elects to make an article open access. What excites you the most about your industry? Itís so broad and general. Quite a lot of my research was on laboratory animals instead of humans. In fact, I did very little research on individuals, but I did conduct extensive research on personal names and considered the differences between the names given to boys and the names given to girls. 4 Marquis Whoís Who Insight | Fourth Edition

Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 5 Dr. Delores Phife Buford Education Educator, Researcher Greenville, SC www.deloresphifebufordedd.com What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? Love and always trying to help. What is the impost important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? For me, I was lucky. Everything went rather smoothly. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Technology is a good friend in education. It was like having another hand and I loved it. It really helped to get things done quickly. What excites you the most about your industry? If there was a problem, I could fix it. I enjoyed making personal connections and watching young people accomplish their goals. Robert B. Comizzoli, PhD Scientist (Retired) RCA Labs and Bell Labs Skillman, NJ How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? When I started working at RCA in 1966, my first projects involved electrophotography or xerography. After working in that area for five years, RCA lost all its patents in those fields because of a lawsuit, so I became involved in semiconductor devices. I applied many of the techniques I had been using in electrophotography to this new area and made some important contributions. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? The reliability of electronic devices and systems. That was the main focus of my career and I developed methods for studying components like transistors and integrated circuits. Also, methods to monitor and study the environmental reliability of entire systems like a central office switch. In the Ď80s and Ď90s, I came up with methods to analyze dust because it was causing problems with equipment. Not a lot of scientists jumped at this kind of project. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? When I started out with the most complicated circuits, there were maybe 50-100 transistors on an integrated circuit and that was in the Ď70s. Of course, now there are millions of transistors on an integrated circuit. The path to get there was making integrated circuits composed of various layers of silicon dioxide, metallization and polysilicon, and those layers were all pattered by a photographic and etching process. Integrated circuits can now have many millions of components on them.

Phyllis J. Heffner, MD Child Psychiatrist Holistic Child/Adult Psychiatry Columbia, MD www.marquistopdoctors.com/2020/06/10/phyllis-heffner How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? I have been seeing patients in the office and virtually during the entire pandemic. In the beginning, a lot of people didnít want to come in, but I had some patients that required in-person treatment. I do things very differently than other psychiatrists because Iím not just using psychiatric medications ó I am looking at what is going on that is causing the psychiatric symptoms. A lot of times, itís not their childhoods. It can be trauma or Lyme or mold. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? Some of the most challenging things are PANS and PANDAS ó Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections. Itís mostly thought of as a childhood illness as a result of an infection or toxin that sets off autoimmunity in the brain. It looks like anger issues, or OCD, or eating disorders, but I see a lot of adults with it, too. Itís not fully accepted in all areas of medicine and was identified at NIH probably 15-20 years ago. There are still a lot of doctors that donít believe in it, but I see a lot of kids with it and some of them and their families are tremendously affected. Diagnosing it comes with a combination of getting a good history and medical tests. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? People in my profession have become more and more focused on giving people medicine and not really knowing people as people. Often, they will spend 10-15 minutes with someone and thatís it. Itís a negative evolvement in my opinion. J. Antonio Lopez, MD Medical Doctor, Owner Lopez Family Practice San Antonio, TX www.lopezfamilypractice.com How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? At the hospital, I make rounds and take care of patients with COVID-19. I manage by consulting with doctors at the hospital and we have worked with nurses that have come from all over the country to help. What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? My patients and the nurses say all the time that I listen to people and then act accordingly in response to medical complaints. There are several doctors I know who donít listen well to patients. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? It has changed a lot with emerging diseases like COVID-19. Nobody knew how the immune system was reacting to the virus, we just learned by exposure. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? I think the future of medicine will be molecular and genetic. We are trying to identify new diseases and establish new treatments. I believe the future will be focused on the immune system and vaccinations. What excites you the most about your industry? Medicine is an everyday challenge. We understand that things like diabetes, hypertension and drug addiction are diseases, but we have to learn from our patients and guide them toward wellness. 6 Marquis Whoís Who Insight | Fourth Edition

Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 7 Parker A. Lynch Chief Executive Officer HedgeHog Health Royal Oak, MI www.hedgehoghealth.com How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? I donít take no for an answer, and I have been workshopping the concept of HedgeHog Health for over five years. It takes up a lot of my time along with the nonprofit that I run. I have had setbacks, but I keep going. What are two key behavior/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? I would say honesty as a leader and transparency. Those are two big things that I want HedgeHog to reflect as a company as well. If we make a mistake or have a setback, clients will hear about it from us. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? Money. Fundraising is essentially the biggest thing because there is a national shortage of board-certified behavioral analysts for autism. One in 54 kids has autism. The real issue is fundraising. We have a huge demand here and parents arenít being helped by autism centers. We work directly with the parents, which is something that autism centers donít typically do. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? I think the acceptance of telehealth and its normalization is huge for us. The new tech that we have come out with is the next generation of the Hoglet with unique features. What excites you the most about your industry? We are just getting started. This is the very beginning for us andweíve already had a buyout offer.We started in June 2020, so itís kind of outrageous. Clearly, weíre onto something if weíve received a buyout offer already. Hugh Patrick, PhD Economist, Educator (Retired) Columbia University New York, NY https://milestones.marquiswhoswho.com/milestone/hugh-patrick How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? I am an academic economist and I have taught at Yale and Columbia for many years. I became a specialist in the Japanese economy and that was because I went to Japan during the Korean War and developed an interest. I was in a country that was classified as developing, but actually it had a strong industrial base and was growing rapidly. I decided to come back to the states to learn more about Japan and economics. I received a Ford Foundation Fellowship to do my dissertation research in Japan and Iíve traveled there every year since 1964 or 1965. The biggest disruption is that Columbia had to close down due to the pandemic. The organization that I have been involved in is the Center on Japanese Economy and Business. We have a staff of five people, who have all had to adjust to working from home. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? I have always taught at rather elite institutions and one is trying to recruit more students from public schools. There is still a way for this to go because thereís a path that people who have money and smarts have access to that others donít. There are a lot of good students in New York, but we have to go out into the country to find more talent and that is clearly an important process. When I first taught at Yale, only men were allowed to attend, so the shift to accepting women was a major transformation and a big improvement. Education is a major way we change value systems. As people become well-educated, they become more open-minded.

Brandon L. Swain Chief Operating Officer Swaintech Entertainment Group LLC Columbia, SC https://milestones.marquiswhoswho.com/milestone/ brandon-swain Entering the entertainment industry in light of his love for music, Brandon L. Swain has excelled as the chief operating officer of his eponymously-named entertainment company, Swaintech Entertainment Group LLC, since the 1980s. Emphasizing that his roots in music trace back to his familyís heritage, he has thoroughly enjoyed his tenure spent in the music business and considers his vocation an enjoyable entity, rather than just a job. When he is not pursuing his career, Mr. Swain gives back to his community through volunteerism, which includes handing out meals to the underserved population throughout his community of Columbia, South Carolina. In addition, he enjoys fishing, motorcycling and spending time with his family inhis leisure time. To remainabreast of developments in the field, he has maintained affiliation with Omega Psi Phi and the Business Management Institute. Additionally, he is associated with the Masons. Mr. Swain has received a myriad of accolades and honors, including from such companies as JFC, AutoZone and WalMart. Notably, he was recognized by the United States government for his work with Martin Luther King Jr.

Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 9 What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? Right now, itís fiscal mostly ó just keeping backers and sponsors because of all the changes in the world. As far as work is concerned, itís not as simple as walking into a place and saying, ďI have a product. Do you want to buy it?Ē Now, itís what makes your product different than anybody elseís. It is keeping sponsors and gaining new sponsorship that has been the most challenging part. People canít just view your product anymore. They can see it, but they canít see it physically. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Virtual meeting is good and bad. In a lot of ways, it has made colleagues lazy. With Zoom, all you have to do is get dressed from the neck down, but itís good because you can reach people faster. What excites you the most about your industry? The sound and the energy from the industry as a whole I think is most exciting even though music is turning back into itself, there are new ideas. The whole industry is exciting to me at this point. As a whole, itís exciting to see how people who do what I do, which is alter the perception of sound. The whole industry is exciting to me at this point. As a whole, itís exciting to see how people who do what I do, which is alter the perception of sound. Attributing his immense success to his familyís support and guidance from his local church, he intends to retire in a few years and hand down his business to his three daughters. Mr. Swain holds a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry from the University of Louisville and a Master of Science from the University of California Berkeley. Married to his wife Michelle since 2014, he is the proud father of Nea, Brandi and Letisha. He also has two grandchildren, Nadia and Kavya. How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? The basis of the company is family and the family is sticking together, creating Zoom options for our clients and prospective clients. We are putting our noses in places that will make us relevant. What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? Just keeping focused. My family and my wife have been a great backbone. My dad told me to not stress about things you canít control.

Dr. S. Kay Rockwell Educator Lincoln, NE https://youtu.be/j8gm1CM-wq0 How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? First, I was a nursing educator and then I was a stay-at-home mom. When I got my masterís degree, I took classes in the evening when my husband was home. I found a part-time job that gave me the opportunity to work on my PhD because I was employed at the university. I always continued to educate myself. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? We need health care for all and it needs to be readily available. I think weíre in a changing environment with COVID-19 and we need to focus on deliverables from a distance. Educators need to be brought up to speed on how to most effectively use distance delivery methods that we now have available to us. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? I had an appointment with my doctor via Zoom; I was at home and she was at the office. We have geniuses out there that are working on these things every day and know far more about it than I do, and they are so much more creative. What excites you the most about your industry? When I graduated from high school, I basically had three choices: I could go into home economics, I could be a secretary, or I could go into nursing. I chose nursing because I was brought up on a farm and my parents didnít have very much money. For $500, I could get a nursing diploma. It was a very economical way for me to get an education. I wasnít particularly excited about nursing, but I was a very good nurse. Mike Syropoulos, EdD School Systems Supervisor (Retired) Macomb, MI http://marquismillennium.com/5thEd/129 What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? Patience ó I am a very easygoing person and nothing really bothers me. I try to look at a situation, solve it, do the best I can and go on. I grew up in Greece and remember when World War II began; I was only 6 years old in 1940. We really suffered during the war ó I donít know how we survived because we were completely isolated from the outside world. After sixth grade, I went to school at night from 6:00 to 11:00 six days a week ó I barely slept. I finally found a job in an advertising agency that was handling the Marshall Plan and I worked there until I immigrated to the United States. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? I always wanted to do the best no matter what I did. In the classroom, I always wanted to do the best I could for the kids that I was teaching. Over the years, Iíve found that a lot of parents have a hard time reading, so I would open up classes to teach them. Sometimes I didnít have enough chairs. What excites you the most about your industry? I try to find the best way to teach students. I like to see people succeed and kids improving. Teaching in the inner city, you never know if the kids will graduate from high school. When I found out that some of them ended up becoming doctors and lawyers, it made me feel really good and Iíve tried to keep in touch with them as much as possible through friends. I got into education to help people and Iím still doing that now. 10 Marquis Whoís Who Insight | Fourth Edition

Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 11 Abigail Nowlin Crawford Author, Consultant ANC Focus Consulting Services, LLC College Park, GA www.whoswhoofprofessionalwomen. com/listee-features/abigail-crawford How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? I had a very supportive staff. I chose people who I knew were effective working in the specific areas to which I was going to assign them. Also, leadership was very supportive of what I was trying to do. What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? I am an easygoing person, and I walked in a teacherís shoes and understood what they were going through. I love thekidsandalways told them that they came first, regardless of what we were doing and regardless of where they came from. There were hard days, but teaching was always something I looked forward to doing because I was helping somebody. I wanted to give back. The Hon. Samuel L. Bufford Philosophy and Law Professor, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge, Lawyer Central District of California Keystone, CO www.iiiglobal.org/user/229 How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? When I was first appointed, everything that came to the court was on paper. My typical reading for the week would be a half-dozen stacks of paper. I had a law clerk and several law students working with me. They would come and spend the semester and get credits for their efforts. One of the things I would have them do is summarize the papers. I would be able to get through them every week that way. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Computers are having a substantial impact. All court proceedings are recorded, but getting transcripts from the recordings has become a lot easier now because of the software that produces written transcripts. Michael A. Cervantes Elementary School Educator (Retired) El Rancho Unified School District San Gabriel, CA www.michaelacervantes.com What are two key behaviors/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? The students that I worked with were low-income and from minority groups. I related to these students through my own experience. English is my second language; Spanish is my first. I was fortunate enough to be successful despite the odds against me. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? Technology has been useful. Once computers were introduced, I became the resource person for technology. As tech advanced, the district started using it for attendance and payroll. When a student would undergo language arts testing, they would do so on the computer and then the results could be passed along to parents.

Timothy D. Francis, DC Chiropractor Chiropractic Kinesiology Las Vegas, NV www.marquistopdoctors.com/2017/11/14/ timothy-francis What are two key behavior/personality traits that allow you to be effective in your role? I have a genuine concern for my patients and I also have a desire to be the best in my field. What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? I am a chiropractic kinesiologist, so the way I practice is with a multidisciplinary approach with a spiritual side built in. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? I handpick study groups, so instead of doing talks once a year by invitation, I would have 25-35 attendees. Now, that study group has dwindled to about seven because I am trying to mentor them using a more one-on-one approach. Dr. HaroldW. Furchtgott-Roth Senior Fellow Hudson Institute Chevy Chase, DC www.marquistopexecutives. com/2019/11/14/harold-furchtgott-roth How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? Politics always change, but the substance doesnít change very much. Itís how you focus on the substance, then there arenít that many dramatic changes. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Not innovations so much, but I think that certain topics over the next decade will dominate my field in the areas of privacy and internet security. How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? It has become much more competitive and the pace of technological innovation has accelerated. What excites you the most about your industry? There are lots of technologists developing new ideas and itís exciting to see. 12 Marquis Whoís Who Insight | Fourth Edition John W. Fisher, PhD, PE, NAE Civil Engineering Educator, Professor Emeritus Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA www.marquistopeducators. com/2020/06/17/john-fisher How have you navigated disruptions in your industry to remain a top professional? My involvement in the research. My research efforts and my involvement in the field led to continuing work. As a result, I have maintained involvement even at my age ó it has kept me active. I became involved in high-strength bolts and welding structures when I was an assistant bridge research engineer. This led me to pursue all of my other work and gain support. What excites you the most about your industry? Younger generations have become involved. There seems to be a slackoff in education focused on my area of expertise and sometimes I see mistakes being made today that shouldnít have been made.

Fourth Edition | Marquis Whoís Who Insight 13 Bruce Jerry Kelman, PhD, DABT, ATS, ERT Toxicologist, Consultant Bellingham, WA www.marquistopscientists.com/2021/08/31/ bruce-kelman What is the most important issue/ challenge you are dealing with in your industry? For toxicology, there has been an over-emphasis on the mechanism of how people are adversely affected by chemicals and an under-appreciation of the importance of exposure. If a mechanism doesnít happen at the exposures people are experiencing, the mechanism really is not relevant to what is making people sick. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? New tools for looking at how genes function and instruct the body are leading to breathtaking advancements. For example, mRNA technologies have allowed researchers to make incredibly safe and effective vaccines in a fraction of the time needed previously. Dr. Anthony Wayne Middleton Jr. Urologist, Educator The University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT www.anthonywmiddleton.com What is the most important issue/ challenge you are dealing with in your industry? Two decades ago, we were developing managed care and now itís evolving with new plans, deductibles, and new ways of managing payments to physicians and hospitals. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Telemedicine. Working at the VA, probably half of our patient interactions are conducted using Zoom or something similar. I think that telemedicine is something that will persist even when the pandemic is over. Developments can occur in a patientís life that you might only pick up on physical examination without the patient telling you. So, thereís good and bad in it. Gail L. Hayden Director CA Farmers Market Association Walnut Creek, CA www.whoswhoofprofessionalwomen.com/ listee-features/gail-hayden How do you feel your industry has changed/evolved? Markets are the second-oldest profession. I think that people are excited to experience the food of other cultures, but I think that they are also after flavor and they want good, healthy food. Within the last 20 years, there has been a change in how people view food. Many see food as fuel and theyíve realized that if they eat well, they feel good. What excites you the most about your industry? Itís a chance for all cultures to come together over good food and it provides the ability to exchange the best things about different foods. It helps to keep the local economy flourishing and local farms operational instead of having to rely on other countries.

14 Marquis Whoís Who Insight | Fourth Edition Shara Sand, PsyD Psychologist New York, NY www.whoswhoofprofessionalwomen. com/listee-features/shara-sand What is the most important issue/ challenge you are dealing with in your industry? The pandemic, because of the disconnect that comes with not being able to see a personís physical body and make connections with their emotions. There are explanations in body language that allow you to read if a person is suffering from anxiety or depression. Itís very hard not to see a face when Iím trying to make a diagnosis. How do you feel you industry has changed/evolved over time? I think that the field has become more modernized. It has become more sensitive to race, gender and sexuality. Also, previously this was a very white profession and it some ways it still is, but there has been a general acknowledgement that there needs to be a change. What excites you the most about your industry? The fact that itís approaching a real willingness to move forward in terms of race, gender and sexuality, and itís recognizing that ignoring these aspects of who people are is damaging and problematic. Prof. Xingwu Wang, PhD Professor of Electrical Engineering Alfred University Alfred, NY http://www.marquismillennium.com/5thEd/133/ What is the most important issue/ challenge you are dealing with in your industry? Right now the problem is how to produce electricity with extreme weather in mind. That requires computer cloud technology to quickly calculate, control and deliver electrical power generation for a large power grid system. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? For renewable energy, 5G wireless communication will shape the control and detection of renewable power generation and consumption. The last mile for renewables is very critical because all solar and wind power generation relies on weather data. The solar radiation, temperature and wind speed should be sensed very quickly and brought to the central control to produce and use electricity. Wendy L. Ward, PhD, ABPP, FAPA, FNAP Associate Provost for Faculty Director of Interprofessional Faculty Development Academic Affairs/COMUAMS Little Rock, AR www.whoswhoofprofessionalwomen.com/ listee-features/wendy-ward What is the most important issue/challenge you are dealing with in your industry? The challenge now is the impact of the pandemic on the workforce. The COVID-19 pandemic is a prolonged, traumatic experience that wears on the body and soul of our health care workforce. So, the challenge is to continue to provide health care services while recognizing everyoneís need for comfort and rest. What innovations or technologies do you feel will shape the future of your industry? Technology is impacting health care in three ways. We can now provide very meaningful, interactive learning events for trainees and continuing education. Now, we are also adept at providing virtual health care visits, which increases the timeliness of and access to care.

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